Film Screening – Los Hermanos: The Brothers

Film Screening – Los Hermanos: The Brothers

Take a musical trip to Cuba with World Community’s next film series offering, Los Hermanos: The Brothers available online anytime from September 10 – 12.

CLICK HERE for film trailer & link to purchase tickets ($10/ individual, $16/ household, $8/ limited income.

Virtuoso Afro-Cuban-born brothers—violinist Ilmar and pianist and composer Aldo—live on opposite sides of a geopolitical chasm a half-century wide. Tracking their parallel lives in New York and Havana, their poignant reunion, and their momentous first performances together, Los Hermanos/The Brothers offers a nuanced, often startling view of estranged nations through the lens of music and family. Featuring an electrifying, genre bending score, composed by Aldo López-Gavilán, performed with his brother, Ilmar, and with guest appearances by maestro Joshua Bell and the Harlem Quartet.

This screening is co-sponsored by the Immigrant Welcome Centre with funding from the province of BC.

Save the date for the next film September 24 – 26.

FairTradeProducts-2016

We sell fairly traded, organic coffee, tea, chocolate, hot chocolate, cocao, olive oil, spices & more.

We are particularly proud of our ongoing relationship with our coffee growers in Pancasan and Dalia, near Matagalpa, Nicaragua. These producers get a guaranteed price above the world market price, freeing them from the risks of its fluctuations. Not only is this coffee superb, the gourmet Arabica beans are freshly roasted in small batches each week at Creekmore’s Coffee in Coombs, B.C.

To celebrate Black History Month, we’re screening several films online - available any time over the weekend of Feb. 26 - 28.

CLICK HERE to PRE-ORDER TICKETS & watch trailers.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about this history both in Canada and the US.

Screenings are free but donations will be accepted to help cover costs. 

 

King in the Wilderness (110 min) focuses on the final two years of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life leading up to his assassination on April 4, 1968. A review in Variety calls this “a searing film because it takes Martin Luther King Jr. down from the mountaintop. You glimpse the real glory of who he was: not a walking monument but a human being with fear, humor, guts, and grace.” Despite enormous pressure, he refused to back away from the civil rights and anti-war challenges of his times.

Canadian content will include three shorter films:

Rush to Freedom (17 min) - In the 1850s, Governor James Douglas fought against American expansionism by bringing hundreds of Black Americans from San Francisco to the area around Victoria where their legacy is still felt today.

Amber Valley (13 min) tells the story of one of the first Black settlements in Canada in Amber Valley, about 100 km North of Edmonton in the early 1900s.

Journey to Justice (47 min) pays tribute to Canadians who fought for Black civil rights from the 1930s to the 1950s. Nine years before Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of a bus in Montgomery, Viola Desmond (now on our $10 bills) refused to move to the Black section of a movie theatre in Nova Scotia in1946. At the same time, Black railway porters were organizing a union for their own protection in one of the few jobs available to them, other Black activists were challenging discrimination wherever they encountered it.

 

FILM SCREENING: I AM GRETA – JAN. 15-19TH

FILM SCREENING: I AM GRETA – JAN. 15-19TH

** Click Here to Pre-Order Tickets (Individual $10, Household $16, Low Income & Students $6)

(2020, 100 min.)  This is the compelling story of teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg. Starting with her one-person school strike for climate action outside the Swedish Parliament, filmmaker Nathan Grossman follows Greta—a shy student with Asperger’s—in her rise to prominence and her galvanizing global impact as she sparks school strikes around the world. The film culminates with her extraordinary wind-powered voyage across the Atlantic Ocean to speak at the UN Climate Action Summit in New York City.

“Even more than describing her cause, the affecting “I Am Greta” introduces us to the person herself, digging deep into why she’s pushing herself so hard, to do what our planet’s adults apparently won’t.” Noel Murray, LA Times.

FMI contact wcdes.cv@gmail.com