Film Screening: Tues, Nov. 19th, 7pm Stan Hagen Theatre, NIC, Courtenay.

Film Screening: Tues, Nov. 19th, 7pm Stan Hagen Theatre, NIC, Courtenay.

As California farmers struggle with drought and other impacts of climate change, our ability to grow and access local food is becoming more important every year. World Community’s film series continues with the film Five Acres (30 min.) followed by a panel discussion with one of the filmmakers and local food activists from Nanaimo and the Comox Valley.

The Five Acre Farm in the Harewood area of Nanaimo has a long history of producing local food. It’s one of the last intact farms in BC’s first planned agricultural community. The history and future of this innovative agricultural project are portrayed in the film Five Acres, by Paul Manly and Laurie McMillan. Manley comments “Through its important work on urban farming, restorative agriculture projects and employment skills training, Nanaimo Foodshare Society is helping build a healthy, sustainable and local food system while providing an inclusive work environment for individuals from vulnerable populations.”

Samuel Robins, Superintendent of the Vancouver Coal Mining and Land Company had some visionary ideas. In 1884, Robbins purchased Harewood Estates, a large parcel of land between Nanaimo and the base of Mount Benson. He subdivided the area into five-acre lots and made them available to mining families as homesteads at affordable prices.

Executive Director of LUSH Valley Food Action Society, Maurita Prato says “I love what is happening with Nanaimo Foodshare Society, our sister Island Food Hub, the City of Nanaimo and the 5 acre farm. There is a lot to learn from this collaborative model of urban farming and community food security.”

Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome. FMI: Janet (250) 337 5412

Following that there’s a film screening on Tuesday Dec. 3 – 7pm at NIC: Artifishal (81 min)

Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, possible threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature. Discussion to follow. Everyone welcome. Admission by donation

Film Screening: The Whale & The Raven- Tues. Nov 5th . 7pm at NIC

Film Screening: The Whale & The Raven- Tues. Nov 5th . 7pm at NIC

Journey via film to Whale Point and Fin Island research outposts in the Great Bear coastal region and meet the remarkable people who call this place home including leaders of the Gitga’at First Nation and whale researchers Hermann Meuter and Janie Wray.

World Community hosts a screening of director Mirjam Leuze’s new documentary at the Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College, Courtenay. The film illuminates the many issues that have drawn whale researchers, the Gitga’at First Nation, and the Government of BC into a complex conflict.

As the Gitga’at First Nation struggles to protect their territory against the pressure and promise of the gas industry, caught in between are countless other beings who live here: humpbacks, orcas, and porpoises who use the Kitimat fjord system as a feeding ground- and playground.

The rhythm of the film mirrors the life in the region, taking the time to reflect on people’s thoughts, on the heartbeats of the forest, and allowing viewers to discover this unique and stunningly beautiful land and seascape at the pace of its wildlife.

Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome.  FMI: Janet (250 337 5412)

Addressing Climate Change – Part 4 – Tuesday, October 1st at 7pm – Upper Native Sons Hall

Addressing Climate Change – Part 4 – Tuesday, October 1st at 7pm – Upper Native Sons Hall

What if the lifestyle changes needed to reduce our environmental impacts actually made our lives more meaningful, rewarding and fun? Join World Community for its final night of public events in the series “The Climate Crisis: Adaptation, Activism and Resilience” 

Organized as a bazaar or marketplace of ideas, “Opportunities for Personal and Community Action” will feature presentations and displays by local change makers - businesses, non-profits and individuals –  who offer concrete ways to reduce our carbon footprint and enhance resilience at the family and community level.

Learn how to add renewable energy to your home, reduce food and packaging waste, invest in planet-healing ventures or thrive by living in cohousing. Have a good idea? Audience members will be encouraged to share their own suggestions and aspirations for changes that we can undertake now.

In the coming decades it is anticipated that climate instability will affect every aspect of our lives. Learning what we can do now to mitigate our impacts is crucial; building the capacity to adapt and thrive in a changing world is equally critical. Perhaps most important is seizing the opportunity this change presents us to begin to re-orient our lives towards the kinds of positive changes that will bring deeper life satisfaction and greater connection with our community.

Presenters:
Randy Chatterjee
Tony Edwards
Tom Dishlevoy
James McKerricher
Nancy Gothard  and Ryan O’Grady
Ginette Matthews
Elaine Codling
Helen Boyd
 
Admission is free. Everyone is welcome. For more information contact 250-650-8694
 
Here is an overview of the Action Items discussed after the event:
 
“Continue to rethink everything - less consumption, more conscious consumption”
 
“Bus travel”
 
“Solar panels installed and predominantly a plant-based diet”
 
“Buying more and more local produce”
 
“Sell my second car!”
 
“Less time on Facebook (ha ha)”
 
“Participate in the Eco-Challenge”
 
“Consciously avoid single use plastics”
 
“Invest in low/no carbon ventures”
 
 
Good Ideas
 
Plant two trees a year and keep them watered
 
Community-based carbon offset program
 
Adopt a stream
 
Turn down the heat and put on socks and sweaters
 
Create an estuary coordinating body
 
Stop all outside burning
 
Have more marches
 
Free buses
 
Improve the bus system - better network required
 
More of this kind of fair. It’s a buzz!
 
More bike lanes and connections for bike routes
 
Bikes not planes!
 
 
The Climate Crisis – Part 3 – Tues, Sept. 24 – 7pm – Upper Native Sons’ Hall

The Climate Crisis – Part 3 – Tues, Sept. 24 – 7pm – Upper Native Sons’ Hall

World Community’s four-part series ‘Addressing the Climate Crisis: Activism, Adaptation, and Resilience’ continues with a Comox Valley focus on “Stitching Together Altered Landscapes –  Place-Based Adaptation and Resilience”  Tuesday, Sept. 24 - 7pm - Upper Native Sons’ Hall, Courtenay.

Human beings have been altering the global landscape for thousands of years. But for the past 150 things have certainly intensified. Local landscapes has been transformed by logging, coal mining, agriculture, road building, industry and development. These altered landscapes are where the local impacts of climate change - flooding, erosion, and loss of biodiversity - first become evident. But these altered landscapes also hold the greatest potential for building resiliency. Kus Kus Sum, The Courtenay Estuary, Morrison Headwaters, Perseverance Watershed, Comox Lake –  these places are at the heart of our local climate story.

Conservationists Tim Ennis, Jennifer Sutherst, and Meaghan Cursons will explore altered landscapes within our community and share how they play a critical role in understanding and responding to climate change. Through stories, photos and discussion they will illustrate how we can stitch these landscapes back together with the threads of adaptation, collaboration and hope.

Join us to learn how you can participate in making a difference for our collective future.  Everyone is welcome.  Admission to the World Community series “Addressing the Climate Crisis” is by donation. 

Doors open at 630. Make time for conversation and connection before and after!

FMI: John Gower from World Community (250-650-8694)

Let’s Talk About The Climate Crisis – Tues. Sept 17th

Let’s Talk About The Climate Crisis – Tues. Sept 17th

Our four-part series ‘Addressing the Climate Crisis: Activism, Adaptation, and Resilience’ continues on Tuesday September 17, 7 pm at Upper Native Sons’ Hall with a climate communications panel covering issues from personal health to collective political action. 

Betty Tate is a member of the Canadian Association of Nurses for the Environment and Comox Valley Nurses for Health and the Environment. She’s seen first-hand how climate change harms Canadians. Betty will describe the dual role health care professionals play helping the mental and physical well being of individuals and influencing policymakers to achieve better health for all.

Will Cole-Hamilton is a trained climate communicator with a background in law and business. Will is a core member of the communication team at Climate Caucus, a national network of mayors, councillors and representatives dedicated to action on the climate crisis. He’ll build on previous presentations to World Community, NIC, the Youth Environmental Action group and students at Queen’s University to describe how communities can effectively communicate with each other about climate.

Kai Nagata is Dogwood’s Director of Communications. Since 2007 Dogwood has been fighting to limit fossil fuel expansion. That’s placed the organization in the cross hairs of powerful corporations and governments who would like nothing more than for this issue to go away. Kai will illuminate how communities can come together to serve elected officials with notice that the days of inaction on climate are over.

Q&A to follow presentations. Admission by donation. Everyone welcome.

More info: David (Dogwood - 604 674-0996) or Janet (250 337-5412)

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The following week - Tues. Sept. 24, 7 pm at Upper Native Sons’ Hall

Stitching Together Altered Landscapes –  Place-Based Adaptation and Resilience

Human beings have been altering the global landscape for thousands of years. But for the past 150 things have certainly intensified. Local landscapes has been transformed by logging, coal mining, agriculture, road building, industry and development. These altered landscapes are where the local impacts of climate change - flooding, erosion, and loss of biodiversity - first become evident. But these altered landscapes also hold the greatest potential for building resiliency. Kus Kus Sum, The Courtenay Estuary, Morrison Headwaters, Perseverance Watershed, Comox Lake –  these places are at the heart of our local climate story. 
Conservationists Tim Ennis, Jennifer Sutherst, and Meaghan Cursons will explore altered landscapes within our community and share how they play a critical role in understanding and responding to climate change. Through stories, photos and discussion they will illustrate how we can stitch these landscapes back together with the threads of adaptation, collaboration and hope. 
Join us to learn how you can participate in making a difference for our collective future. Everyone is welcome. Admission to the World Community series “Addressing the Climate Crisis” is by donation. Doors open at 630. Make time for conversation and connection before and after!
World Community Addresses the Climate Crisis

World Community Addresses the Climate Crisis

World Community is hosting a series of four special events on the theme ‘Addressing the Climate Crisis: Activism, Adaptation & Resilience’. The series of films, panel discussions, and presentations will highlight some of the positive actions taking place in our community. The goal is to provide inspiration for individuals, organizations, candidates and elected officials to take meaningful actions to mitigate the impacts of the climate crisis and to create a more resilient community.  The series opens with the new documentary, The Human Element (80 min.), on Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 7pm in the Upper Native Sons’ Hall. In this compelling and visually stunning documentary, National Geographic environmental photographer James Balog (featured in Chasing Ice) captures the lives of everyday North Americans on the front lines of climate change. Ancient Greeks considered the elements of earth, air, fire and water to explain the nature and complexity of all matter. But there is another element to consider, the human element.
“We’re a force of nature too. People are changing the elements, and the elements are
changing us,” Balog says in the film. “Today, truth and evidence matter more than ever. The visual evidence shows that people are changing the other elements fast. …It’s up to us to make the right choices.”
The film will be followed by speakers Arzeena Hamir and Helen Boyd who will offer some positive responses to address the climate crisis.  Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome. FMI: John (250-650-8694) or Bridget (250 871-1424)

About Guest Speaker: Arzeena Hamir

Arzeena earned a Bachelor’s degree in Crop Science from the University of Guelph and a Master’s in Sustainable Agriculture from the University of London, England. She worked as a CUSO volunteer in Thailand and as a researcher in Jamaica, India, and Bangladesh. She also served as the Coordinator of the Richmond Food Security Society from 2008-2012, and in 2010 helped launch the Richmond Farm School. In 2018, Arzeena was elected to the Board of the Comox Valley Regional District where she serves as both Vice Chair and Director, Area B. She and her husband run Amara Farm, a 25-acre certified organic farm in Courtenay, BC.

About Guest Speaker: Helen Boyd

Helen Boyd is the Coordinator of the Comox Valley Nurses for Health & the Environment and a member of the Canadian Association of Nurses for the Environment (CANE). She has a dual background as a registered nurse and holds a Masters in Counselling. This evening, she will speak to the Eco-Anxiety that is experienced in the face of the current Climate Crisis and share practical strategies that can be applied both on individual basis and collectively. 

About Guest Speaker: Nalan Goosen

Nalan Goosen is a grade 10 student at Mark R. Isfeld Secondary School. Nalan instigated the first Student Strike for Climate Change in the Comox Valley. Following in footsteps of GretaThunberg, Nalan is co-leading the same initiative here at home.

Mark your calendars for the following Tuesdays for subsequent events in the series:

Tues. Sept. 17 – Panel discussion – Climate Communications – ‘Let’s Talk about the Climate Crisis’ with Betty Tate, Will Cole-Hamilton, and Kai Nagata.

Tues. Sept. 24 – The Climate Crisis: Place-based Adaptation and Resilience with Tim Ennis (Conservation Partnerships), Meaghan Cursons (Cumberland Community Forest Society), and Jennifer Sutherst (Project Watershed, Kus-kus-sum).

Tues. Oct. 1 – Sharing Opportunities for Personal and Community Action with over a dozen community leaders and activists.

All events: 7pm - Upper Native Sons’ Hall.   Admission by Donation.  Everyone welcome.