World Community postpones March 24 screening: Assholes : A Theory

World Community postpones March 24 screening: Assholes : A Theory

As an action of social solidarity, World Community is postponing the screening of the popular
film, Assholes: A Theory which was scheduled for March 24th at the Stan Hagen Theatre,
North Island College. Please follow our World Community Facebook page to be notified about
rescheduling of this film and for news about films you may watch from home.
Our lending library of DVDs and BluRays previously screened at our film festival is located at
the Bayside Cafe and is available to members of our society. Memberships may be
purchased online ( www.worldcommunity.ca ) or at the Bayside Cafe on Cliffe Avenue, across
from the Driftwood Mall. FMI: 250 337 5412With venomous comments on social media and the rise of authoritarianism, the time has come for Assholes: A Theory — an entertaining and timely documentary from acclaimed director John Walker.

Some grapple with the challenge of treating other human beings decently. Others are just… assholes, claims Professor Aaron James in his New York Times bestselling book, Assholes: A Theory. This intellectually provocative film, inspired by James’s book, takes a playful approach to uncovering why unsavoury behaviour is on the rise in the workplace, in government, and at home, and more importantly, how do we stop it?

Lively commentary is provided by Monty Python actor John Cleese, former Canadian police officer Sherry Lee Benson-Podolchuk, Italian LGBTQ activist Vladimir Luxuria and others. Why do assholes thrive in certain environments? What explains their perverse appeal? And how do they keep getting elected?

Best Documentary Script, Writers Guild of Canada; Best Documentary, Nova Scotia Screen Awards

Film Rating: Parental Guidance/ Coarse Language, Nudity.  Admission by donation.   FMI: 250 337 5412

Film Screening: 2040, Tues. Feb. 11th,  7pm at NIC

Film Screening: 2040, Tues. Feb. 11th, 7pm at NIC

Film Screening: 2040, Tues. Feb. 11th, 7pm at NIC

The votes have been tallied from the recent World Community Film Festival. Audience pick for “Best of Fest” is the inspirational film “2040” which will be re-screened at the Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College.

Award-winning director Damon Gameau embarks on a journey to imagine what the world would look like by the year 2040 if we simply embraced the best solutions to the climate crisis already available to us. What if we made these currently available practices into policies, shifting them into the mainstream, to improve our planet?

Structured as a visual letter to his 4-year-old daughter, Gameau creates a positive vision of what the planet could look like in 2040 when his daughter will be 25. From micro-grid renewable energy now in full swing in Bangladesh, to farmers switching to regenerative agricultural methods, and marine permaculture, Gameau shows that in many cases, action is being led from the ground up. “Fact based dreaming,” is how he describes his filmmaking technique.

“This film inspires optimism about the better world we can create collectively by 2040 if we address Climate Change now” comments Helen Boyd, of the Comox Valley Nurses for Health & the Environment. This film is creating a real ‘buzz’ on the festival circuit and is inspiring people to action in their own communities.

Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome to attend; the 92 minute film is classified as “General – no advisories”. FMI: 250 337-5412 or visit the World Community facebook page.

Film Screening: Tues Jan. 21st – 7pm at NIC

THE SEQUEL - As we enter 2020, it’s a great time to imagine our collective future. Join World Community for the documentary, The Sequel, at the Stan Hagen Theatre at North Island College. The film explores the work of environmental economist David Fleming and the vibrant Transition Movement his ideas inspired.

Around the world, people are developing the skills, will and resources necessary to re-imagine civilization, even in the event of an uncertain future. We encounter extraordinary projects and people such as renegade economist Kate Raworth, philosopher Roger Scruton, Gaian ecologist Stephan Harding and localization revolutionary Helena Norberg-Hodge.

These visionaries are cultivating a resilience not reliant on the impossible promise of eternal economic growth. Instead, they are developing diverse alternatives and rekindling hope in the creativity and intelligence of people to nurse our communities and ecology back to health.

Everyone is welcome. Admission by donation   FMI: 250 337 5412

Film Screening: Tues, Nov. 19th, 7pm Stan Hagen Theatre, NIC, Courtenay.

Film Screening: Tues, Nov. 19th, 7pm Stan Hagen Theatre, NIC, Courtenay.

As California farmers struggle with drought and other impacts of climate change, our ability to grow and access local food is becoming more important every year. World Community’s film series continues with the film Five Acres (30 min.) followed by a panel discussion with one of the filmmakers and local food activists from Nanaimo and the Comox Valley.

The Five Acre Farm in the Harewood area of Nanaimo has a long history of producing local food. It’s one of the last intact farms in BC’s first planned agricultural community. The history and future of this innovative agricultural project are portrayed in the film Five Acres, by Paul Manly and Laurie MacMillan. Manly comments “Through its important work on urban farming, restorative agriculture projects and employment skills training, Nanaimo Foodshare Society is helping build a healthy, sustainable and local food system while providing an inclusive work environment for individuals from vulnerable populations.”

Samuel Robins, Superintendent of the Vancouver Coal Mining and Land Company had some visionary ideas. In 1884, Robins purchased Harewood Estates, a large parcel of land between Nanaimo and the base of Mount Benson. He subdivided the area into five-acre lots and made them available to mining families as homesteads at affordable prices.

Executive Director of LUSH Valley Food Action Society, Maurita Prato says “I love what is happening with Nanaimo Foodshare Society, our sister Island Food Hub, the City of Nanaimo and the 5 acre farm. There is a lot to learn from this collaborative model of urban farming and community food security.”

Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome. FMI: Janet (250) 337 5412

Following that there’s a film screening on Tuesday Dec. 3 – 7pm at NIC: Artifishal (81 min)

Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, possible threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature. Discussion to follow. Everyone welcome. Admission by donation

Film Screening: The Whale & The Raven- Tues. Nov 5th . 7pm at NIC

Film Screening: The Whale & The Raven- Tues. Nov 5th . 7pm at NIC

Journey via film to Whale Point and Fin Island research outposts in the Great Bear coastal region and meet the remarkable people who call this place home including leaders of the Gitga’at First Nation and whale researchers Hermann Meuter and Janie Wray.

World Community hosts a screening of director Mirjam Leuze’s new documentary at the Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College, Courtenay. The film illuminates the many issues that have drawn whale researchers, the Gitga’at First Nation, and the Government of BC into a complex conflict.

As the Gitga’at First Nation struggles to protect their territory against the pressure and promise of the gas industry, caught in between are countless other beings who live here: humpbacks, orcas, and porpoises who use the Kitimat fjord system as a feeding ground- and playground.

The rhythm of the film mirrors the life in the region, taking the time to reflect on people’s thoughts, on the heartbeats of the forest, and allowing viewers to discover this unique and stunningly beautiful land and seascape at the pace of its wildlife.

Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome.  FMI: Janet (250 337 5412)

Addressing Climate Change – Part 4 – Tuesday, October 1st at 7pm – Upper Native Sons Hall

Addressing Climate Change – Part 4 – Tuesday, October 1st at 7pm – Upper Native Sons Hall

What if the lifestyle changes needed to reduce our environmental impacts actually made our lives more meaningful, rewarding and fun? Join World Community for its final night of public events in the series “The Climate Crisis: Adaptation, Activism and Resilience” 

Organized as a bazaar or marketplace of ideas, “Opportunities for Personal and Community Action” will feature presentations and displays by local change makers - businesses, non-profits and individuals –  who offer concrete ways to reduce our carbon footprint and enhance resilience at the family and community level.

Learn how to add renewable energy to your home, reduce food and packaging waste, invest in planet-healing ventures or thrive by living in cohousing. Have a good idea? Audience members will be encouraged to share their own suggestions and aspirations for changes that we can undertake now.

In the coming decades it is anticipated that climate instability will affect every aspect of our lives. Learning what we can do now to mitigate our impacts is crucial; building the capacity to adapt and thrive in a changing world is equally critical. Perhaps most important is seizing the opportunity this change presents us to begin to re-orient our lives towards the kinds of positive changes that will bring deeper life satisfaction and greater connection with our community.

Presenters:
Randy Chatterjee
Tony Edwards
Tom Dishlevoy
James McKerricher
Nancy Gothard  and Ryan O’Grady
Ginette Matthews
Elaine Codling
Helen Boyd
 
Admission is free. Everyone is welcome. For more information contact 250-650-8694
 
Here is an overview of the Action Items discussed after the event:
 
“Continue to rethink everything - less consumption, more conscious consumption”
 
“Bus travel”
 
“Solar panels installed and predominantly a plant-based diet”
 
“Buying more and more local produce”
 
“Sell my second car!”
 
“Less time on Facebook (ha ha)”
 
“Participate in the Eco-Challenge”
 
“Consciously avoid single use plastics”
 
“Invest in low/no carbon ventures”
 
 
Good Ideas
 
Plant two trees a year and keep them watered
 
Community-based carbon offset program
 
Adopt a stream
 
Turn down the heat and put on socks and sweaters
 
Create an estuary coordinating body
 
Stop all outside burning
 
Have more marches
 
Free buses
 
Improve the bus system - better network required
 
More of this kind of fair. It’s a buzz!
 
More bike lanes and connections for bike routes
 
Bikes not planes!