Let’s Talk About The Climate Crisis – Tues. Sept 17th

Let’s Talk About The Climate Crisis – Tues. Sept 17th

Our four-part series ‘Addressing the Climate Crisis: Activism, Adaptation, and Resilience’ continues on Tuesday September 17, 7 pm at Upper Native Sons’ Hall with a climate communications panel covering issues from personal health to collective political action. 

Betty Tate is a member of the Canadian Association of Nurses for the Environment and Comox Valley Nurses for Health and the Environment. She’s seen first-hand how climate change harms Canadians. Betty will describe the dual role health care professionals play helping the mental and physical well being of individuals and influencing policymakers to achieve better health for all.

Will Cole-Hamilton is a trained climate communicator with a background in law and business. Will is a core member of the communication team at Climate Caucus, a national network of mayors, councillors and representatives dedicated to action on the climate crisis. He’ll build on previous presentations to World Community, NIC, the Youth Environmental Action group and students at Queen’s University to describe how communities can effectively communicate with each other about climate.

Kai Nagata is Dogwood’s Director of Communications. Since 2007 Dogwood has been fighting to limit fossil fuel expansion. That’s placed the organization in the cross hairs of powerful corporations and governments who would like nothing more than for this issue to go away. Kai will illuminate how communities can come together to serve elected officials with notice that the days of inaction on climate are over.

Q&A to follow presentations. Admission by donation. Everyone welcome.

More info: David (Dogwood - 604 674-0996) or Janet (250 337-5412)

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The following week - Tues. Sept. 24, 7 pm at Upper Native Sons’ Hall

Stitching Together Altered Landscapes –  Place-Based Adaptation and Resilience

Human beings have been altering the global landscape for thousands of years. But for the past 150 things have certainly intensified. Local landscapes has been transformed by logging, coal mining, agriculture, road building, industry and development. These altered landscapes are where the local impacts of climate change - flooding, erosion, and loss of biodiversity - first become evident. But these altered landscapes also hold the greatest potential for building resiliency. Kus Kus Sum, The Courtenay Estuary, Morrison Headwaters, Perseverance Watershed, Comox Lake –  these places are at the heart of our local climate story. 
Conservationists Tim Ennis, Jennifer Sutherst, and Meaghan Cursons will explore altered landscapes within our community and share how they play a critical role in understanding and responding to climate change. Through stories, photos and discussion they will illustrate how we can stitch these landscapes back together with the threads of adaptation, collaboration and hope. 
Join us to learn how you can participate in making a difference for our collective future. Everyone is welcome. Admission to the World Community series “Addressing the Climate Crisis” is by donation. Doors open at 630. Make time for conversation and connection before and after!
World Community Addresses the Climate Crisis

World Community Addresses the Climate Crisis

World Community is hosting a series of four special events on the theme ‘Addressing the Climate Crisis: Activism, Adaptation & Resilience’. The series of films, panel discussions, and presentations will highlight some of the positive actions taking place in our community. The goal is to provide inspiration for individuals, organizations, candidates and elected officials to take meaningful actions to mitigate the impacts of the climate crisis and to create a more resilient community.  The series opens with the new documentary, The Human Element (80 min.), on Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 7pm in the Upper Native Sons’ Hall. In this compelling and visually stunning documentary, National Geographic environmental photographer James Balog (featured in Chasing Ice) captures the lives of everyday North Americans on the front lines of climate change. Ancient Greeks considered the elements of earth, air, fire and water to explain the nature and complexity of all matter. But there is another element to consider, the human element.
“We’re a force of nature too. People are changing the elements, and the elements are
changing us,” Balog says in the film. “Today, truth and evidence matter more than ever. The visual evidence shows that people are changing the other elements fast. …It’s up to us to make the right choices.”
The film will be followed by speakers Arzeena Hamir and Helen Boyd who will offer some positive responses to address the climate crisis.  Admission is by donation. Everyone is welcome. FMI: John (250-650-8694) or Bridget (250 871-1424)

About Guest Speaker: Arzeena Hamir

Arzeena earned a Bachelor’s degree in Crop Science from the University of Guelph and a Master’s in Sustainable Agriculture from the University of London, England. She worked as a CUSO volunteer in Thailand and as a researcher in Jamaica, India, and Bangladesh. She also served as the Coordinator of the Richmond Food Security Society from 2008-2012, and in 2010 helped launch the Richmond Farm School. In 2018, Arzeena was elected to the Board of the Comox Valley Regional District where she serves as both Vice Chair and Director, Area B. She and her husband run Amara Farm, a 25-acre certified organic farm in Courtenay, BC.

About Guest Speaker: Helen Boyd

Helen Boyd is the Coordinator of the Comox Valley Nurses for Health & the Environment and a member of the Canadian Association of Nurses for the Environment (CANE). She has a dual background as a registered nurse and holds a Masters in Counselling. This evening, she will speak to the Eco-Anxiety that is experienced in the face of the current Climate Crisis and share practical strategies that can be applied both on individual basis and collectively. 

About Guest Speaker: Nalan Goosen

Nalan Goosen is a grade 10 student at Mark R. Isfeld Secondary School. Nalan instigated the first Student Strike for Climate Change in the Comox Valley. Following in footsteps of GretaThunberg, Nalan is co-leading the same initiative here at home.

Mark your calendars for the following Tuesdays for subsequent events in the series:

Tues. Sept. 17 – Panel discussion – Climate Communications – ‘Let’s Talk about the Climate Crisis’ with Betty Tate, Will Cole-Hamilton, and Kai Nagata.

Tues. Sept. 24 – The Climate Crisis: Place-based Adaptation and Resilience with Tim Ennis (Conservation Partnerships), Meaghan Cursons (Cumberland Community Forest Society), and Jennifer Sutherst (Project Watershed, Kus-kus-sum).

Tues. Oct. 1 – Sharing Opportunities for Personal and Community Action with over a dozen community leaders and activists.

All events: 7pm - Upper Native Sons’ Hall.   Admission by Donation.  Everyone welcome.

Film Screening: Resilience -Tues. May 28th at 7 pm

Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope (60 min.) at the Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College, Courtenay.

Recent research has shown how homelessness, drug addiction, obesity, and even cancer and heart disease are often linked to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). There are simple things caring adults can do to prevent stressful events turning into toxic stress with lifelong consequences.

An expert panel from the Local Action Team for Child & Youth Mental Health will provide valuable insights and resources after the screening.

Doors open at 6:30 to check out the information tables in the lobby. Admission by donation.

Film Screening: What is the Electric Car?  – Tuesday May 14, 7pm at NIC

Film Screening: What is the Electric Car? – Tuesday May 14, 7pm at NIC

Climbing gas prices and environmental concerns are encouraging people to consider making the shift to various electric modes of transportation. World Community will screen the film at the Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College, Courtenay .
This entertaining and educational film looks at some of the myths people have about electric cars (speed, range, etc.) and gives thought-provoking information to consider. Vendors, drivers, and enthusiasts share their views.
With thousands of dollars currently available as incentives for purchasing electric cars, some people who watch this film may soon end up driving their own electric vehicle.

Resource people will be available to answer questions after the film.

Admission is by donation.
FMI: 250 337-5412

 

For even more information, attend the Move 2 Electric event on Saturday May 18th from 10 am to 4 pm at the Comox Valley Sports Centre parking lot. Learn about electric cars, bikes and scooters, and talk to owners and experts. Test drive an electric car or e-bike, and find out about incentives for purchasing electric vehicles. Admission to the event is free.

FMI: check out the Comox Valley Electric Vehicle Association or Watershed Sentinel Facebook page.

This Mountain Life to screen April 30th

This Mountain Life to screen April 30th

The awe that mountainous landscapes evoke is universal. World Community is pleased to present the multi award-winning film, This Mountain Life (77 min.)  at 7 pm on Tuesday April 30 at the Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College, Courtenay.

For some people, the draw of the mountains is so strong that their lives revolve around it. Martina Halik and her 60-year-old mother Tania attempt a bitterly cold 2300-kilometer ski trek from BC to Alaska through the treacherous Coast Mountains; a journey that has been completed only once before, and never by two women.

Their adventure is interspersed with beautifully crafted portraits of high-altitude human endurance: the gripping story an avalanche burial; a group of nuns who inhabit a mountain retreat to be closer to God; an impassioned alpinist; a focused snow artist; a couple who has been living off grid in the mountains for nearly 50 years.

Shot in cinematic detail, This Mountain Life is a stunning visual experience and a profound spiritual journey set high in the peaks of British Columbia, Canada.

Filmmakers Grant Baldwin and Jennifer Rustmeyer  (Clean Bin Project and Just Eat It) will join via Skype for a Q&A session after the screening.

Admission is by donation. FMI:  250 337 5412

Also - Coming Soon  – What is the Electric Car? (75 min.)

Tuesday, May 14th, 7pm at NIC.
This entertaining and educational film looks at some of the myths people have about electric cars (speed, range, etc.) and gives thought-provoking information to consider. Vendors, drivers, and enthusiasts share their views. People who watch this film may soon end up driving their own electric vehicle.

Film Screening: March 12th  Sgaawaay K’uuna (Edge of the Knife)  (105 min)

Film Screening: March 12th Sgaawaay K’uuna (Edge of the Knife) (105 min)

630pm - Sid Williams Theatre, Courtenay

SGaawaay K’uuna (Edge of the Knife) is a 105 minute 2018 Canadian drama co-directed by Hluugitgaa Gwaai Edenshaw and Jaada Gyaahlangnaay Helen Haig-Brown. It is the first feature film spoken only in dialects of the Haida language (with subtitles). Set in 19th century Haida Gwaii, it tells the classic Haida story of the traumatized and stranded man transformed to Gaagiixiid, the wildman.

The film was created primarily by indigenous people, including the co-directors, a mostly amateur crew, and the Haida cast. In 2017, Edge of the Knife actors were taught to speak Haida (endangered dialects with only 20 fluent speakers) at a two-week intensive training camp and throughout the five weeks of filming.

First shown on September 1, 2018 to the primary audience, Haida Gwaii residents, SGaawaay K’uuna made its public premiere six days later at the Toronto International Film Festival, which named the film in its Canada’s Top Ten list. At the Vancouver International Film Festival, the film was voted Best Canadian feature, Best BC Film, and Most Popular Film. Further nominations and awards have been presented to actors and costume designers.

“They say a fire calls you into the forest. The cold will make you desperate to catch the fire; but no matter how long you run, you cannot catch the fire. You run and run until your mind is sick and the spirits take you over. You become wild. You become Gaagiixid.”

The film is set in the 1800s in Haida Gwaii. At a seasonal fishing camp two families endure conflict between the nobleman Adiits’ii and his best friend Kwa. After Adiits’ii causes the accidental death of Kwa’s son, he flees into the rainforest, descending into madness and transforming into Gaagiixid – “the Wildman.” When the families return in the spring, they discover Adiits’ii has survived the winter. Can he be rescued and returned to his humanity? Meanwhile, Kwa wrestles with his deepest desire – revenge.

Presented by World Community, I-Hos Gallery, Xyuu Xyahl Gaang.nga - Southeast Wind Dancers, Immigrant Welcome Society, and the Sid Williams Theatre Society.

This event features an opening Haida cultural performance by Xyuu Xyahl Gaang.nga - Southeast Wind Dancers. We’re thrilled to have director Hluugitgaa Gwaai Edenshaw join us for a post screening Q&A session via Skype.

Admission is by donation (suggested $8 or what you can afford). Doors to the lobby will open at 5 pm. Theatre entrance at 6 pm. FMI: 250 337 5412